Thursday, 30 May 2013

Small Heath Butterfly

As with the Dingy Skipper featured in the previous post, the Small Heath is as its name suggests, small and measures approximately 34 to 38mm across the wingspan. The first indication that you would probably get observing this species is a small butterfly with plain light tan coloured upper wings flying along close to the open ground. When it pitches the wings are always folded and measure about 18mm closed. With its small appearance and under wing colour it blends into the ground where it normally pitches. For such a delicate little thing it is quite hardy and can be found throughout the United Kingdom.








16 comments:

  1. Excellent images Roy. A beautiful little butterfly, another one that you have to get down low for as it usually settles deep in the grass!...[;o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Trevor, they are very wary at the best of times and getting close isn't easy.
      I did a lot of walking around following these to get the shots.

      Delete
  2. Hi Roy Once again, very good shots of this butterfly. Looks like it was a sunny day. Margaret

    ReplyDelete
  3. Nice images Roy and it's great to see that the variety and number of butterflies in your neck of the woods is continuing to increase as we move into summer :-)

    I've been enjoying a catch up of all your recent pots and you have captured some superb images lately, especially all the butterflies and blossom. The Dingy Skipper shots from the other day are superb !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks David, I have certainly seen more this year so far, than last anyway.

      Delete
  4. I am jealous of your sunny days!!! ;-)
    How unfair!! It is pouring all day long in the south of France, it's terrible!
    What lovely picture of the Skipper and the Small heath!
    All butterflies are hiding here!!
    Well done Roy!
    Cheers!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Noushka, sunny days in Eastern England and rain in the South of France, that can't be normal surely.{:))

      Delete
  5. Hey Roy....Come on now , I know you pulled that on out of your hat, it seems to be getting bigger ; )
    Seriously, I can't believe the butterflies you have seen!! I think it is going to be a bad year for them here!! I have only seen the Mourning Cloak,and by now with the Lilacs in bloom they are usually covered with Yellow Swallowtails!
    I will have to keep enjoying your lovely photos I guess !
    Nice
    Grace

    ReplyDelete
  6. You are getting to see quite a variety of flutters Roy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes John, I am looking in the same places as last year, but getting more luck this year.

      Delete
  7. Super butterfly shots in all your recent posts Roy. Until last year I had never seen a Small Heath and the one I found then was more than an hours drive from home. Last year was the first time I had seen Dingy Skipper too.

    Lovely to see the sunny shots of the Brimstone and Speckled Wood, you've certainly been getting some nice weather where you are which has to be good for the flutters :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jan, we have had a few nice days now.{:))

      Delete
  8. This is quite a difficult butterfly to be beautiful to photograph, but you did it very well. If you are very quiet and cautiously go to him succeed but often he has you in mind. Beautiful colors and details

    ReplyDelete
  9. It took a while Helma to get a good shot.(:))

    ReplyDelete

Thank you so much for visiting
and commenting on my blog