Wednesday, 29 May 2013

Dingy Skipper Butterfly

The Dingy is small and very difficult to see at times measuring only 29mm across the wingspan.
It flies low over open grassland and being dull brown blends with dead grass and patches of soil when pitched. When on something green it still needs some finding because of its size.
In bright sunlight as soon as it moves it is also difficult to track and follow.
If you haven't seen a Dingy Skipper before, you could be forgiven for thinking it was some form of small daytime moth.

I took these shots on Sunday last and are the first I have seen of this species this year.









18 comments:

  1. I'm so relieved you have seen butterflies, I have hardly seen any and it's worrying. I have, at least, seen bees of various kinds. I hope to explore more over the weekend in the woods and fields.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Although the weather has been indifferent at times Helena, I am encouraged by the various species I have seen this year already, as opposed to past year.

      Delete
  2. Nice photos Roy! I managed to see a few of these at the weekend, along with some Green Hairstreaks which I will endeavour to post at some point, although they are obviously not as good as yours!
    J
    Follow me at HEDGELAND TALES

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Roy No I don't think I have ever seen a Dingy butterfly before. Seen closely (as you have here) it is really very beautiful. Well done for capturing it. Margaret

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Margaret, its only in recent years that I have noticed them as they are so insignificant and you think, Oh Moth!

      Delete
  4. You know this little butterfly very beautiful capture Roy. The beautiful and fine details are very clear. Very well done.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great images Roy. As you say they're difficult to see, and track! Fortunately I managed to see a good few of these as well as some equally challenging Grizzled Skippers over the weekend. I also managed to find some Green Hairstreaks and, new to me, good numbers of Duke of Burgundy Fritillary...It was a good weekend!...[;o)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Trevor.
      Duke of Burgundy, I am extremely envious. I have never seen one.{:(

      Delete
  6. A great series Roy. One I've never seen before.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Keith.
      You may have done Keith and thought it was a moth.{:))

      Delete
  7. Lovely photos of the Dingy Skipper. I still haven't seen many species of butterfly this year; I hope that changes soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Wendy, I have certainly seen more than last year at this time.

      Delete
  8. Lovely set of pictures Roy! I got a picture of one that I took today at Durlston Country Park.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Lyn, I will see if you have posted it.{:))

      Delete
  9. I've never seen this butterfly Roy, and the translation is really bad. Do you also know the scientific or latin name? Anyway, your pictures are beautiful, the pattern on the wings, details and colours. Nice captures and thanks for sharing.

    Regards,
    Marianne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Marianne, the latin name is (Erynnis tages).

      Delete

Thank you so much for visiting
and commenting on my blog