Tuesday, 17 May 2022

Brimstone in Flight


I was observing this female Brimstone Butterfly as it was moving along a bush and laying eggs as it went along.
It was then disturbed by a passing male and a short display of aerial activity occurred.

This provided some opportunity for fast shutter speed shooting, although I didn't have the ideal lens at the time.



The shot below was taken at the time that the female was launching herself into the air, hence the open wings position which one doesn't normally see.




 






Thursday, 12 May 2022

A Loud Report From The Bushes


Yes, you have guessed right.
It is another Cetti's Warbler Post. 
They are quite vocal now and scald you for even daring to walk across their territory. Notoriously difficult to photograph, but with observation of a likely Cetti's territory will reap the reward of at least a couple of shots. They have a pattern of monitoring their territory and continuous observation will reveal a good spot to wait for them to turn up. 











 

Tuesday, 10 May 2022

Grey Wagtail by the Stream


It is always a pleasure to observe and photograph the Grey Wagtail.
I know for a pair that nest each year along a Village Stream.
So at this time, I make a point of spending sometime there waiting for the male and the female that use the various little stones and rocks in the water as vantage points for catching the numerous flies that exist on or over the water.








 









Sunday, 8 May 2022

The Duke Returns

The Duke of Burgundy Butterfly.

I live only a few miles from a site at Cerne Abbas which is known to have a population of the Duke of Burgundy Butterfly.
The Butterfly (Imago) part of its life cycle is from last two weeks in April to the first week in June.
The species is rare and the population is in serious decline. It can only be found in a few locations in England.


I was very fortunate on a second recent visit to the nearby location to witness a mating pair of the Duke as shown above.


The Duke is the only 'metalmark' family species to be found in UK. 
It was originally classed as a member of the 'fritillary' family.