Tuesday, 3 September 2013

Fruits, Seeds and Brimstone

All images shot during recent Woodland Walk.


Blackberries.{:))
The Blackberry season is upon us and I shall have to take a plastic bag the next time.


I found two Brimstone Butterflies feeding on a small patch of Purple Loosestrife fairly deep in woodland. 

Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicara) is generally associated with watercourse, it was strange to find it in that location, although the water table is pretty high in the area which is probably the reason.
I know its an invasive plant and apparently one plant can produce up to 3 million seeds in one year. However it also provides food for many insects.


Strange to find an apple of this size growing wild in woodland. Larger than crab and they don't look like cider apples.?


Hazelnuts


A favorite food plant of several species of butterfly, the Brimstone certainly enjoys feeding from the Common Fleabane (Pulicaria dysenterica).



Funghi about 4cm across growing under trees.



Hips from the Dog Rose.


Haw Berries from the Hawthorn bush


Another foodplant favoured by the Brimstone, the Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense)




Sloe fruit from the Blackthorn bush.



Oak trees are now producing the acorn much to the Jay's and the Squirrel's delight.


In the image below you can see amongst the Acorns some Oak Apples. 
This form of oak apple is actually the Oak Marble Gall which is caused by the Gall wasp (Andricus kollari) laying eggs in the leaf buds, which are then distorted into this shape. 
There are some 360 different species of Gall wasp in Europe.


The Rose Bedeguar
Formed by the Gall wasp (Diplolepis rosae) that lays eggs in a leaf bud of the Dog Rose, which then chemically induces the distortion of the bud.





25 comments:

  1. Galls are fascinating things aren't they? We've lots of Brimstones here, I'm just waiting on a Clouded Yellow!

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    1. There are a lot of reports of Clouded Yellows this year CT and they have still got a lot of flight time left this year so fingers crossed.

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  2. the acorns looks very attractive Roy and maybe a blackberry pie coming up with a good spoonful of cream on the side?

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  3. Great post Roy, it's good to see that nature's supermarket is well stocked and ready for the upcoming months. It's also good to see the Brimstone as they feed up in preparation for their big sleep!...[;o)

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    1. Thanks Trevor, I hope all this well stocked nature doesn't mean a really bad winter.

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  4. wat een heerlijke wandeling Roy het fruit aan de bomen de bloemen en vlinders ja de herfst is op komst,geweldig mooi.

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  5. Hi Roy

    I really enjoyed your photos of the light on the berries.

    Guy

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  6. Brilliant photos Roy, and fascinating to learn of the Gall wasp.

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  7. Hey Roy..I love this post, so many wonderful things happening !!
    Blackberries, don't need a Ziploc bag!! You just lay in the field pop them in your mouth and watch the clouds float by...well that's what we did when we where kids!!
    The best way to enjoy them!! : )
    Awesome photo's with wonderful subjects, no way I could can pick a favorite well maybe the Brimstone on the Loosestife : ) ( there is the same controversy here about it to)

    Grace

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    Replies
    1. Thanks GG, I need a bag to bring some home for a blackberry and apple pie.{:))

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    2. "Wow" that's sounds delicious, then you will need a bag : )!!

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  8. Interesting information you wrote Roy. And furthermore the nice pictures of the brimstone, very nice. And, I think you don't have to go to the supermarket this week. Just bring a BIG bag and do the walk again ;-).

    Regards,
    Marianne

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    1. OK Marianne, I will take a bag next time.{:))

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  9. Plenty of natural produce down your way Roy, this year looks like making up for the near disaster that was last year :-) Love the Brimstone shots !

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    1. Thanks David, yes its quite noticeable how much is around this year. Oak trees in particular are really overloaded with acorns.

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  10. A very special and beautiful blog with a variation of autumn and summer :-)
    Beautiful and kleurijk and also very beautiful set

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  11. Lovely set of pictures, like the ones of the Brimstone butterfly. I've noticed a young Oak tree jam packed with acorns. Loads of Blackberries around here, masses of them. I have a Dog Rose that is loaded with rose hips. The Blackthorn has not done so well, not so many sloes.

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    1. Thanks Lyn, the blackthorn in this area is loaded.

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  12. Thank you for the nature Id lesson!! I wondered if the blue berries were sloe, and you confirmed it. Bumper berry crops this year! The birds and mammals will be pleased.

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  13. Yes it is a really good year for everything like that Helena.

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