Tuesday, 26 May 2015

Small Tortoiseshell

The Small Tortoiseshell (Aglais urticae)

One of our common species found throughout the UK.
This one below found on stinging nettles beside a river is a male. 
The male has a wingspan of 50mm whereas the female is 56mm.
This species doesn't colonise and moves freely across country.




22 comments:

  1. Hey, nice picture of the clover!

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  2. Haven't seen any for a little while, wondering if that's a newborn rather than a hibernator

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    1. This I think this is a hibernator in good condition Simon as the second brood don't emerge to well into June normally.

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  3. Gorgeous! They're very common here as well.

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  4. Jolie série Roy,
    il va falloir que je retourne les voir dans les prairies.
    Bonne soirée

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  5. Hey Roy...I don't know how you get these great shot's of butterflies. You must be able to sneak up on them ;}
    I have seen 3 different butterflies in the last few days. They sure do move fast, and at 88 degrees and high humidity the last few days I wasn't about to chase them.

    Grace
    Grace

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    1. Thanks GG.
      Yes I tend to sneak up on things.{:))

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  6. Nice. The little fox, I have not seen it myself but it's beautiful butterflies :-)

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  7. I have only seen a couple of Tortoiseshell this Spring, hopefully we will see more of these in June/July.

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    1. Yes they have been a bit sparse the last couple of years Lyn.

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  8. Definition and colors are simply amazing!...
    You do magic with you camera, Roy!
    Beautiful work!

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