Thursday, 23 April 2015

Hare-larious Special

If you are a Naturalist/Wild Life Enthusiast/Nature Photographer or whatever you wish to call yourself observing the countryside, we only on very rare occasions witness something that is quite amazing and a privilege to see. 

The other morning I went for a walk in the regular Woodland Reserve.
As I was making my way along a hard track I observed in the distance (Approx 100 metres) something which momentarily, I wasn't sure what it was. I instinctively placed my camera in the 'ready' position and on looking immediately through the lens I could see it was a Hare. Oddly, he was coming along the track towards me. I started shooting off images of it and kept as still as possible. It stopped on at least three occasions (Probably as a result of hearing the camera shutter clicking) and then continued on towards me. It came that close eventually that it over filled the frame of what was a 400mm lens and I was struggling to get him all in the frame. 

Then it suddenly realised (probably because I was turning my camera in the Portrait position) that I was there and it shot off back down the track at a speed that only a Hare could achieve.  
He appeared in good health and free of disease, (Bright eyed and bushy tailed). 
I could see no reason for what would be considered a hareless, I mean careless approach.

I would like to be able to say that due to my amazing 'Fieldcraft' that these shots were possible. 
Truth is it was probably more like 5% Fieldcraft and 95% pure luck.

Over the years I have observed numerous Hares out in the field, but I have never seen one that close before.











42 comments:

  1. You got some really amazing shots of the hare! They don't normally like to pose.

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  2. It seems to be the case that many animals and birds don't notice you until you move; I've had similar experiences with foxes, weasels and a barn owl. The fox in particular did exactly what you describe - stopping frequently and looking straight at me but apparently unable to compute what I might be. I was looking through binoculars so there was no shutter noise to alert him of my presence. I also had a Barn Owl fly straight towards me, perhaps thinking I was a ragged old post on which he might perch, again I was looking through the bins and it wasn't till he looked so close that I instinctively ducked that he swerved away in panic!

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    1. Your definitely not easy to 'Compute' John.{:))

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  3. Roy These ara amazing images adn such a proveledge for you to see one so close.

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  4. Brilliant...one of those special moments that come along all too rarely.
    You did a great job in holding your composure(!) to get these stunning images...well done Roy...[;o)

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  5. Wow! Encounters like that make such memories!

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  6. Utterly fantastic! I've never seen a hare closer than about 100 metres away, and always running like hell in the opposite direction from me!

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  7. I do believe that 90% of "fieldcraft" is being in the field! Great series. That last image is priceless!

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  8. Those are a fabulous series Roy.

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  9. Great captures and wonderful sequence, Roy, hare-larious indeed. There was surely more than 5% of your merit as you were attentive, ready and well-behaved, all of that counts! :)

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    1. Thanks Petra, not sure about the well behaved bit though.{:))

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  10. I don't think I've ever seen such a great set of photos of a hare; usually just the one from a VAST distance and slightly blurry. These are amazing Roy. By the way, when I saw the little picture in the sidebar, I thought it was a Kangaroo,,....

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    1. Thanks Em. Not many 'Roos' around these 'yer' parts.

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  11. That's a big wow Roy! How marvelous for you...and us.

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  12. What a wonderful experience Roy, just occasionally we are treated to moments like you describe and they are always very special aren't they. The images are superb :-)

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  13. Hey Roy... Oh my these shot's made me laugh out loud. :) :) What a "lucky" encounter for you to get these great shot's they are just wonderful. He sure is handsome,a perfect specimen ; ).

    Grace

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    1. Thanks GG. It was hare-raising.{:))

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  14. Niesamowite ujęcia !!!
    Amazing shots !!!

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  15. What fun. I had the same experience with a bobcat on my birthday several years ago.

    We have "jack rabbits" out in the desert. I've tried to shoot them in the past, but they can put a lot of distance between the camera and themselves before I can get the camera up to my face. So yes, this is indeed serendipity.

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  16. Wow!! I especially like the nochalance in the sixth shot. An incredible experience, you lucky man:)

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  17. Marvellous experience and wonderful photos of course. Whilst I'd love a 400mm lens, I guess there's a downside to a prime lens! (I'm guessing that's what it is...)
    Loved your butterfly images in the previous post too. Not fair that everyone else is seeing Brimstones feeding - mine just fly around really fast and never land. But later in the year they do so I've plenty of captures of them, so not really complaining! :-)

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    1. Thanks Mandy. Yes thats the downside of a 400mm. It is meant to be used primarily for birds and mostly they are in range OK and in this case the Prime is best.

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  18. Great that you hare so beautiful and so close to photograph.

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  19. My goodness, Roy, how lucky that was!
    An fantastic and rare opportunity you perfectly turned to your advantage!!
    Brilliant portraits of a rather shy animal.
    Congrats!!

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  20. Such long legs! Great shots of it! Glad you got to see it so close.

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    1. Thanks Mary, yes a rare opportunity.

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