Saturday, 12 July 2014

White Admiral - Target Species

White Admiral Butterfly (Limenitis camilla)

Last year in the woodland reserve that I visit, I had a very brief sighting of a White Admiral and there was no chance of getting one photograph. So this year it was designated my 'Target Species' especially as I had not seen one for several years.

I visited the reserve earlier this week and as has been the case recently, I observed plenty of the Silver-washed Fritillary which I have featured already in the Blog. So I was busily shooting away at the Fritillary on some Bramble flowers and suddenly from the trees above I  noticed a different butterfly dropping down and landing on the Brambles. I instinctively knew straightaway that it was the White Admiral. I moved into a position to take the first shots, thinking all the time that it was going to fly away, but it didn't hence the images below. I couldn't get any really good shots of the underside which is very pretty, but you can't have everything.  




Note how more brown it looks when the bright sunlight is shining on it.



There is not much difference in appearance between the male and female apart from the wingspan which is 60mm and 64mm respectively. It frequents woodlands and likes shady spots to pitch for feeding. It is mainly restricted to Southern parts of England, but can be found in East Anglia. It flies between July and August.



Another shot below in the shade.





22 comments:

  1. Hi Roy brilliant shots of the While Admiral. I am on the I.O.W. and for the first time, yesterday I saw onHave a wonderful weekend.e of these butterflies. I was thrilled but did not get as good shots as you but i am sure someday I will post them!

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  2. Oh, my, didn't you get some lovely shots!! I will always remember the first time I saw White Admirals. I'd been hiking in the hills of central Cape Breton, and when we came back out onto the old logging road, they were everywhere. They clustered around me, looking me up and down, and I felt like Cinderella!

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    1. Thanks Karen, if you see two in one day here you are considered very lucky.

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  3. Great shots Roy, I'm far to up north to see one of these lovely Butterflies, but there has been good numbers of ones I can see. If we keep having good years, you never know more might start moving North.
    Amanda xx

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    1. Thanks Amanda, I think most things are moving North gradually due to the ongoing change in temperature.

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  4. GHeweldig Roy wat staan deze vlinders er heel mooi op.

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  5. Nice one Roy! Still looking for my first one this year, didn't see any last year. Been a couple of times to Bedford Purlieus, but no luck yet.
    J
    Follow me at HEDGELAND TALES

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    1. Thanks John.
      Not visited there yet this year.

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  6. Lovely flutter Roy. Don't think many of those will visit my garden.

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  7. Well captured Roy.

    The habitat (partial shade with honeysuckle) and temperature is vitally important for this species to continue to breed successfully. Despite the availability of both on my patch I only saw ONE during a transect walk today.

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    1. Thanks Frank. I briefly observed one last year, no photo though.

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  8. I just have one word for your work, Roy: STUNNING!!!
    Tomorrow, I will visit your blog with more time and attention.
    Time has been too short, lately.
    Many thanks, for your visit, and kind words, today.
    Have a great Sunday!
    Ana

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  9. I don't know very much about butterflies, except that they are beautiful and amazing. Nice shots!

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  10. Hey Roy... What a beauty, and the photo's are so lovely and clear!!
    You had to be luck to have one stay still long enough to get the open winged shot's : )

    Grace

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    1. Thanks GG, yes I was very lucky to see it at all I think.

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