Saturday, 29 December 2012

The Great Tit (Parus major)

One of our common and most colourful species.



I have read recently that the Great Tit population in UK is under some threat from a rather unpleasant disease. It was apparently brought into the country via infected mosquitos. Although by itself it is not fatal, it can deter the bird from feeding thereby rendering it weak and more susceptible to predation.
Thankfully, Scientists confirm however that it is unlikely to cause a great decline in numbers.



A typical life span of the Great Tit is 3 years. 
One bird was recorded in 1990 at the age of almost 14 years.


Hopefully this is one species that will remain one of our resident birds and survive in large numbers to grace our bird feeders and its woodland territories.



20 comments:

  1. Couldn't agree with you more Roy! A lovely bird that I am lucky to have coming to the garden in good numbers, hopefully that will continue.
    Lovely selection of shots!
    J
    Follow me at HEDGELAND TALES

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  2. Lovely shots Roy.
    A bird with so many different calls, but always good to see them.

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  3. A lovely little bird and always a welcome sight in the garden. Let's hope it is not too affected by the disease and that it will soon acquire resistance to it.

    Hope you have been enjoying a lovely Christmas.

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    1. Thanks Jan, yes apart from the weather Jan thanks.

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  4. Great set of images Roy, always nice to see these birds in the garden. Unfortunately the regular pair that were visiting my garden earlier this year seem to have been depleted by one!! I hope he/she finds a new mate before too long...[;o)

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    1. Thanks Trevor, yes it will soon be the season again hopefully.

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  5. Hey Roy...He is a real cutie and especially like the black strip that goes around there neck and down the middle of the chest : ) looks like he has a lapel!!
    Hope there survival rate makes it possible for them to grace
    feeders,and woodlands for a long time : )
    Grace

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  6. It's a beautiful bird, Roy.

    According to our measures, three years are not much to live. I wonder how it is possible that the one bird lived almost five times the life span that it's typical. Perhaps the answer is in the word "typical"...

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    1. I dont know why they use 'Typical' Petra when average may be a better form of measure.

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  7. Lovely set of shots Roy. My GT is still roosting every night in her nest box.

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    1. Thanks John, thats a good job she is what with the weather now.

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  8. Such a colorful tit! They look fairly large, too. I hope the disease doesn't reduce their numbers too seriously. Would be sad to lose such a pretty bird.

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    1. Thanks Mary, yes they are our largest species of the Tit family.

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  9. Great shots Roy :) I was unaware of the disease you have highlighted and like others I hope this doesn't cause any long-term problems for this handsome woodland species.

    PS. Happy New Year :)

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